Ultrasound

We are proud to offer ultrasound services at all of our imaging locations, with extended evening hours to accommodate all of our patients. Our certified ultrasound technologists will provide you with friendly, professional care during your exam.

Offered at: Johnston Health, Johnston Health Ambulatory Imaging, and Johnston Health Clayton Ambulatory Imaging

What is an Ultrasound?

An ultrasound, also referred to as sonogram or ultrasound scan, uses high-frequency sound waves to produce dynamic, visual images of your organs, tissues or blood flow. The sound waves are transmitted to the area of interest and the returning echoes recorded. This produces a real-time image of the movement and structure of the body’s internal organs and blood flow.

This procedure allows technologists to diagnose a variety of diseases and conditions without having to use radiation or an invasive procedure. It is completely safe and there are no known risks. Ultrasounds can be used to examine several areas of the body including abdomen, pelvis, breasts, extremities and liver. Ultrasounds are also used throughout pregnancy to examine and monitor a baby’s development.

What to Expect

During an ultrasound, you will lie on an exam table so the technologist can access the body part being examined. You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothes, or a hospital gown may need to be worn.

A water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being examined, and a device called a transducer is pressed against the skin. This emits the sound waves into the body. The technologist will move the transducer along the skin at various angles to ensure a thorough examination. Most ultrasounds will last 30-45 minutes.

How to Prepare

Preparation needs vary depending on the part of the body being studied. Some tests do not require any preparation. Several tests require you to have a full bladder, and you may be instruction to drink 24-36 oz of water prior to the exam.

Click below for preparation instructions for specific types of ultrasounds, and be sure to follow any individual instructions from your physician.